For an assessment and contrast of nonsouthern lynching and lynching that is southern see Pfeifer, ed., Lynching beyond Dixie.

For an assessment and contrast of nonsouthern lynching and lynching that is southern see Pfeifer, ed., Lynching beyond Dixie.

For the view that the western had not been specially violent, see Robert R. Dykstra, The Cattle Towns (nyc, 1968).

For a characterization of this debate decades that are several, see Robert R. Dykstra, “Quantifying the crazy West: The Problematic Statistics of Frontier Violence, ” Western Historical Quarterly, 40 (Sept. 2009), 321–47. On western bloodshed, but using the assertion that frontier mayhem ended up being overstated, see Eugene Hollon, Frontier Violence: Another Look (nyc, 1978). When it comes to argument that the frontier had been violent, however in certain means, see Roger D. McGrath, Gunfighters, Highwaymen, and Vigilantes: Violence regarding the Frontier (Berkeley, 1984), 247–60. On high homicide prices in counties in Nebraska, Colorado, and Arizona, see Clare V. McKanna, Homicide, Race, and Justice into the United states West, 1880–1920 (Tucson, 1997). For an interpretation regarding the reputation for homicide across United states areas that looks at broader habits and particularity that is regional see Randolph Roth, American Homicide (Cambridge, Mass., 2009). More